Halloween Activities Week: Monster Movie Marathons

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One of the best ways to spend a chilly October evening is watching Monster Movies.  If you have a home video collection filled with the Macabre or access to Netflix or a similar video-streaming service, this is relatively easy to do.  You can either plan out a schedule of films to watch or select them in a spontaneous manner.  After all, who hasn’t said, “It feels like a Creature from the Black Lagoon kind of night?”

Now, if you don’t have access to the Diabolic on demand, there are a number of alternatives.  Throughout the month of October, movie channels will be featuring a variety of fright flicks.  You can catch Pet Sematary and Halloween IV on AMC in the days leading up to Halloween.  Or you can spend your entire Halloween day plastered to the living room couch, watching  Horror Classics on Turner Classic Movies.

Beginning October 11, AMC will feature a variety of films that are sure to cause a fright.  From Cujo to Friday the 13th, there are a slew of Horror flicks worth watching.  Check out the schedule here.

And then, every Wednesday in October, Turner Classic Movies is featuring our favorite Monster Movies.

Here are some highlights:

PLEASE NOTE:  THESE ARE HIGHLIGHTS.  THERE ARE PLENTY OF OTHER MONSTER MOVIES SHOWING ON TURNER THROUGHOUT OCTOBER.  ALL TIMES LISTED HERE ARE FOR VIEWERS IN THE PACIFIC TIME ZONE. ALL TIMES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE.  CONSULT THE TURNER CLASSIC MOVIES SCHEDULE FOR THE MOST UP-TO-DATE INFORMATION. 

October 10

5:00 PM PST – The Haunting (1963)

7:00 PM PST –  The Uninvited (1944)

9:00 PM PST – The House On Haunted Hill (1959)

October 17

5:00 PM PST – Horror of Dracula (1958)

6:30 PM  PST- Curse of Frankenstein (1957)

8:00 PM PST – The Mummy (1959)

October 24

5:00 PM  PST – The Raven (1963)

6:45 PM PST – Murders In the Rue Morgue  (1932)

8:00 PM PST – The Black Cat (1934)

October 31

3:30 AM PST- London After Midnight (Restoration) (1927)

4:30 AM PST- The Ghoul (1933)

6:00 AM PST – House of Dark Shadows (1970)

11:30 AM PST – Last Man On Earth (1964)

1:00 PM – Devil Bat  (1940)

2:15 PM PST – White Zombie  (1932)

3:30 PM PST- The Body Snatcher (1945)

5:00 PM PST – Frankenstein (1931)

6:30 PM PST – Son of Frankenstein (1939)

8:15 PM PST – The Wolf Man (1941)

9:30 PM PST – The Mummy (1932)

11:00 PM PST – The Mummy’s Hand (1940)

November 1

12:15 AM PST – Island of Lost Souls – (1933)

1:30 AM PST- The Invisible Man (1933)

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Toy Fair 2012 Monsters | Pictures of All the New Toys

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Any opinions expressed in the following article do not constitute an endorsement of any product or retailer.   The following is for information purposes only.

They have risen again.  Nearly 15 years ago, the Universal Monsters saw a resurrection from the grave with the introduction of Classic Monster Postage Stamps.  The stamp collection prompted the release of Universal Monster figures from a major toy studio – Hasbro – and eventually led to the impressive Sideshow Toy line of figures.Now, they’re back.

Two major toy companies have the license  and will be producing some great toys over the next few years.  The first, of course, is Diamond Select, which secured the license from Universal a few years back.  Since that point, Diamond has been issuing two Mego-style Monster figures in their “Retro-Cloth” series and three PVC Monster action figures every Halloween, along with a selection of Mini-Mates and alternative sculpts.  All of those lines are going to continue into the foreseeable future.

This year, Diamond will release two new “Retro-Cloth” figures:  The Bride of Frankenstein and the hotly anticipated Creature from the Black Lagoon.  The 2012 PVC figures include The Phantom of the Opera and Metaluna Mutant from This Island Earth.   The 2012 Mini-Mates include The Mummy and The Hunchback of Notre Dame.

In 2013, Diamond will release  new PVC action figures:  The Hunchback of Notre Dame, The Mole People and a Boris Karloff Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.

Diamond is also planning on releasing a Frankenstein Bust Bank.

This year, Mezco also secured a Universal license and will be producing some terror-ific looking pieces.  They will be releasing three stylized figures of The Mummy, Frankenstein and The Creature from the Black Lagoon.  In addition, they will be releasing the Universal Monsters in their Living Dead Dolls series.  The first two will be Dracula and Frankenstein, both of which will be released in 2013.  The final product from the upcoming assortment will be a “Big Frankie” version of their stylized Frankenstein figure.

Let us hope that Mezco will also take on the concept of playsets and introduce all of our favorite characters as small action figures with accompanying “scenes” and “play environments”.  But time will tell…

Another exciting story out of Toy Fair 2012 is that the characters of Mad Monster Party will finally be released in action figure format.  This long-anticipated toy series will be coming from Diamond Select.  Wave 1 will include Boris Karloff’s Baron Boris von Frankenstein, the character of Count Dracula as well as that of the Frankenstein Monster.  Surely, all of our other favorite Monsters are waiting in the wings…

Finally, Diamond will also be producing new Munsters figures, in addition to “Silver Screen” versions of the first series.

Underrated Classics | Dracula’s Daughter

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It seems as if, in the world of Universal Studios Classic Horror, there is one sequel which gets all of the attention – The Bride of Frankenstein.  Granted, it deserves all of the admiration it receives – and more!  But, there are other follow-up films in the Universal canon that are wonderfully-made which also are owed a great deal of respect.  Perhaps the most under-appreciated is Dracula’s Daughter.

A direct sequel to Dracula, the movie begins just moments after the original ends.  Two bumbling policemen stumble upon the body of Renfield in the basement of Carfax Abbey, where they also meet a very much alive Professor Van Helsing (credited as “Von Helsing”).  Admitting to driving a stake through the heart of the evil Count, Van Helsing is arrested for murder and seeks the aid of a trusted friend, Jeffrey Garth.  Garth, a psychiatrist and former student of Van Helsing, must help the professor prove that Van Helsing did not murder anyone, that Dracula was indeed already dead for 500 years – a seemingly impossible task.  But, when the body goes missing and London is once again rife with bloodless corpses, proving Van Helsing’s innocence becomes a tad bit easier.

The film stars Gloria Holden in the title role.  Playing Countess Marya Zaleska, Holden definitely holds a candle to Bela Lugosi’s performance in the previous film, channeling his eerie presence in nearly every scene.  It’s hard to imagine any actress but Holden being able to utter, in such genuinely distant fashion, the famous line, “I never drink… wine.”  Like Lugosi, Holden commands the screen.  Everything about her is eerie, foreign, intriguing, seductive, and just plain creepy.  Her motivations are also the most complex of any early Horror character.  A reluctant vampire who loathes the control Dracula still exerts over her, even from the grave, Countess Zaleska seeks psychiatric “release” from the curse of the vampire, yet still embraces her father’s evil ways.

The film is very much in keeping with the style of the original, using the same sets for Dracula’s Castle, carrying over Edward Van Sloan as Professor Van Helsing, referring frequently to characters and situations in the original, and even lifting lines (and a camera shot) from the 1931 classic.  Dracula’s Daughter really is a terrific sequel.  The intended parallels between this film and the original work wonderfully.  The only thing that drags the film down is its uneven pacing and its tendency to dwell too much on the comedic relationship between Dr. Garth and his secretary.

But, for every fault in the film, there are ten positive things which work to its advantage.  In addition to the great performances by Holden and Van Sloan, the film’s music is atmospheric, moody, and chilling.  The theme, used in the opening and during the climax, is one of the best, if not the best, in the Universal Horror repertoire, rivaling the main theme of The Wolf Man as the most sweepingly tragic, dark and elaborate piece of music in the early history of Horror.

While the sequel could have taken any number of directions, and it almost took a very weird one with James Whale helming the first efforts, this film is very enjoyable for what it is.  It could have starred Bela Lugosi.  It could have had Van Helsing be the main hero.  It didn’t.  And, as such, it should be judged on its own merits – and it has plenty.  Perhaps, one day, fans of the genre will come to realize this and bolster Dracula’s Daughter to its rightful place in the Universal library – not being nearly as good as The Bride of Frankenstein, but deserving a lot more credit than some of the later Dracula and Frankenstein sequels.  Overall, the film earns a solid  4 out of 5 stars.