The Meaning of Halloween | An All Hallows Toast 2015

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Thank you for checking in with us during our 2015 Countdown to Halloween!  We shall see you all next year…  Until then…

Mothers have a holiday.  Fathers do too.  Veterans, the United States of America, laborers, pilgrims, grandparents, and Jesus all have holidays.  But do the children have one, a day that is all their own?  Yes.  Yes, they do.

There exists one night each year when the children make the rules, when they use their imaginations to the fullest, when they are given free reign of their worlds, when every door opened offers the opportunity for reward.  That night is Halloween.

Halloween is the one day out of the year that truly belongs to the children, the ones ages two to twelve, and the ones ages thirteen to 102 who refuse to grow up.  Halloween is the one night of the year when it is all right for each of us to return to the fantastic world of childhood, when we can allow make-believe things to scare us, and when we can dress up, be silly, and be ourselves – just as the children do.

So, here is to the children, both young and old, to the fantasies of youth, and to the one night when imagination knows no boundaries.  Here is to our holiday.  Here is to Halloween.

Happy Halloween!

Happy Halloween!

 

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Halloween Cardboard Die-Cut Gallery: Creatures of the Night

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The Big Scare is proud to announce the final installment of this year’s Halloween Cardboard Die-Cut Gallery.  We hope you have enjoyed all of the frightening images you have seen here.  We will be back with even more images next year.  Until then, take in the terror-ific sights of these Halloween frights.  We’ll be back in two days with another post.

 

Dinner on Halloween Night

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The real question on Halloween night isn’t “What’s for dessert?”  It’s “What’s for dinner?”

The following does not constitute an endorsement of any product or retailer.   It is for information purposes only.

There are a variety of options out there when it comes to dining on Halloween night, before all of the trick or treating festivities begin.  Many folks opt for a traditional dinner.  They eat whatever they normally would before heading out for Ghost Night.  Some, however, get a little more festive.  They order special treats, like the Papa Murphy’s Jack-O’-Lantern Pizza.

But there are plenty of other options!  One thing is for certain, no Halloween dinner would be complete without the “Official Drink of Halloween”….  Chocolate Milk.  This year, Kroger stores are selling bottles of the creepy concoction with a “It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown” theme.  Paired with some Bat-Shaped Chicken Nuggets from Banquet…  That sounds like three cheers from The Wolf Man to me.

Halloween Cardboard Die-Cut Gallery: Jack-O’-Lanterns

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Greetings, Boils and Ghouls!  Today we continue our series on The Big Scare featuring images that will bring the Halloweens of Yesteryear to electric life!  Today, we highlight the magic of the Jack-O’-Lantern.  Enjoy these boo-tiful creations.

Halloween Cardboard Die-Cut Gallery: Witches

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They call it the season of the witch, so what better Halloween character to feature in today’s gallery than that of the Wicked Witch!

Evil Green Witch

Today’s gallery features depictions of the craftiest old crones in the history of Halloween.  The images seen here were produced from the early 20th century through the 1980s by a variety of manufacturers.  There are certain traits that most of the witches share.  Green complexions, long noses, warts, and capes appear on several of the witches in the gallery, and nearly all of them are seen riding brooms.  (The association between witches and brooms stretches back the Dark Ages where the first images of witches riding brooms were depicted on elaborately illustrated manuscripts.)  And while the broom is but one of a series of similarities, there’s really only one thing that all of the images truly have in common: the tall, pointy hat.  That conical hat was first associated with witches in the early 18th century; it became popular in Victorian storybooks, was donned by the Wicked Witch of the West in The Wizard of Oz, and, as such, has remained a staple of the witch’s wardrobe ever since.

Now that you have been educated on the origins of these witches’ outfits, feel free to delight in the devilment of the delightful die-cut art!

Halloween Cardboard Die-Cut Gallery: Bats and Ghosts

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Welcome back, foolish mortals, to our haunted mansion of the macabre!  Today we continue with our series on vintage Halloween decorations!  Our ghastly line-up today features die-cut images of bats and ghosts!

 

Halloween cardboard cutouts reached peak popularity in the second half of the 20th century.  There are a few companies that were quite well-known for manufacturing these paper masterpieces.  The most renowned of these is The Beistle Company.  Beistle was founded in 1900 and, since then, has produced some of the most iconic images of the Halloween season.  Beistle is still in business today, and remains a giant in the party products industry, but the company’s current output pails in comparison to what was produced in the last century.  That being said, they offer a limited line of vintage reproduction products called “Vintage Beistle”.  The line-up is rather small and doesn’t delve too deeply into the massive catalog of products released from the 1920s through the 1980s.

Another manufacturer of macabre images is Eureka!  Eureka created dozens of die-cuts that defined October in the 1970s and 1980s.  Enjoy today’s images, many of which are of Beistle and Eureka products, and stay tuned for more devilishly delightful die-cut art!

Halloween Cardboard Die-Cut Gallery: Black Cats

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Greetings, Boils and Ghouls!  Today we begin a new series on The Big Scare featuring images that will bring the Halloweens of Yesteryear to electric life!

Beistle Jointed Black Cat

We have created several galleries of vintage Halloween cardboard die cut decorations for your booing pleasure.  In the 20th century, these paper cutouts adorned windows and walls in homes and schools during the month of October.  The earliest ones started appearing in the 1920s.  By the 1950s, they were staples of the season.  Nowadays, there aren’t that many being produced, and the ones that are being created are nearly all computer-generated.  Fortunately, we have nearly 100 years of cardboard die-cuts to draw from for our galleries.  What’s more, every die-cut that will be featured in our galleries is hand-illustrated, designed by an artist or team of artists who captured the spirit of the season with old-fashioned ink and paint.

We launch our Halloween die-cut gallery series with images of one of Halloween’s foremost icons: the black cat!  Enjoy!  And come back in two days for more devilishly delightful die-cut art!